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Flower of life (first analysis)

CHAPTER 13

FLOWER OF LIFE
(First Analysis)

To the extent that the branch of what I call the “angelic geometry” of spherical drawing (with compass only) is exceedingly widespread (as can be seen from our chapters so far), we who have been accustomed to rectilinear drawing consider it demanding and, to put it mildly, tiresome. Therefore I have decided, for my own sake as well as for all the readers who follow these chapters, (however not by abandoning “angelic geometry”, but by making it more easygoing), through exploring and analyzing the so far acknowledged artifacts to see what they “hide” or what they bring, respectively; and does all this make any sense or is it once again something we do not understand or cannot understand yet. Nevertheless, if geometrical artifacts were symbols considered sacred all over the world, then something is certainly hidden behind those apparently ordinary drawings. For sure they were not drawn in the distant past just because the idea simply entered somebody’s mind in the distant past.

Among the spherical drawings only with a compass, the best known and oldest and most sacred is the so-called “Flower of Life”, thus it is appropriate to start off with it, providing that we do not neglect its circumferential completion (the third circle as in the original figure in which we can see its petal – the part that arose from one more serial arrangement which will also be erased – but only at the end of this study). We will try to discover the meaning of these petal components. In the beginning let’s focus on drawing the “Flower of Life” – the basic central circle and the “build up” of circles of same radius until we reach the radius of three in vertical line and the circumference radius and on it we perform its division – on its circumscribed arc – so that this arc expresses itself as the basic circle, about the magnitudes of angles that come up from these divisions and the radiuses of seeable centers as the starting point of all radiuses from six poles – the first, central circle, the circles of the center itself. However, we will “skip” the geometric progressions of intersections that thereby come into being, the reason for so doing is our “primitivism”, i.e. the execution or effect of division with semicircles only with a compass.

But, not to theorize too much, let’s just take into the compass a random radius – unknown, and circumscribe a circle of the same radius until we form a “flower of life” and circumscribe it with a circle that we use as the “mirror” for all the divisions of radiuses from the center of the divisional “puzzle” (First Book – the Flower of Life).

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The circle of the „Flower of Life“ divided by circles of same radius that are further divided by circles of same radius (three in vertical line)  – The first book of Sacred geometry.

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In which way does the radius of the first circle reflect itself on the circumference system to start the division (with semicircles) from the peak pole of the circumference? It divides ito into 75 parts (hence, from the subtended pole it would be 150)   360° ÷ 75 = 4.8°  360° ÷ 150 = 2.4°

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The divisional circles of the first (central) circle create intersections. We circumscribe them with a circle of larger radius and with that radius circumscribe circles from the poles of the first circle.

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In that way we have acquired series of intersections within the first (central) circle. Then we circumscribe its star polygon internal to the circle’s intersections. The radius of that circle divides the perimeter’s arc of the “Flower of Life” into 24 parts. 360 ÷ 24 = 15°

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The second intersections are exterior to the central circle. The radius of these intersections divides the perimeter’s arc into 40 parts. 360° ÷ 40 = 9°

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The third intersections of this constellation, i.e. their radius, divide the perimeter’s arc into 102 parts: 360° ÷ 102 = 3.5294117°.  There are still other intersections but we omit them since the number of divisions rises and we know that the bigger the number of divisions, the result is more susceptible to errors with the use of this “primitive” tool of ours – the compass.

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Therefore we proceed to the third intersections of the “Flower of Life”, their radius. And from the six poles of the central circle it forms a new constellation – new intersections – if drawing with full circles is applied.

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Let’s take the first intersections external to the central circle. Circumscribed them and with semicircles of same radius divide the perimeter’s arc of the “”Flower of Life”. From the peak pole it divides it into 72 parts.  360° ÷ 72 = 5°

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The second intersections (from the center outward); their radius divides the perimeter’s arc into 8 parts.   360 ÷ 8 = 45°

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And the last intersections divide the perimeter’s arc into 13 parts, but only from the peak pole (from the subtended pole it is 26 parts, etc).   360° ÷ 13 = 27.692307°

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Now let’s take the last intersections of the “Flower of Life” into the range of the compass. That radius divides the perimeter circle into 55 parts from one pole. 360° ÷ 55 = 6.54 54 54°

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Now we draw that radius from six poles of the first (central) circle of the “Flower of Life” and acquire new intersections. The first internal ones divide the perimeter’s arc into 43 parts (from one pole)    360 ÷ 43 = 8. 372093°

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The following intersections – the radius divides the perimeter’s arc of the “”Flower of Life” into 15 parts.      360 ÷ 15 = 24°   360 ÷ 30 = 12°

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Now let’s take only the perimeter circle and draw from all 6 poles of the central circle’s first “Flower of Life”. We have acquired the last constellation from six poles of the central circle’s “Flower of Life”.

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The first internal intersections are vague and so we skip them and take the second radius from the center. That radius divides the perimeter circle of the “Flower of Life” into 54 parts.      360° ÷ 54 = 6.666°…

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The third intersections divide the perimeter’s arc of the “Flower of Life” into 32 parts. 360° ÷ 32 = 11.25°

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The first intersections external to the perimeter – their radius, divides the perimeter’s arc of the “Flower of Life” into 21 parts  (from the peak pole; from subtended pole into 42 parts)  360° ÷ 21 = 17.143857°   or   360 ÷ 42 =  8,.5714285°

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And the last intersections of that constellation divide the perimeter’s arc of the “Flower of Life” (their radius) into 9 parts, and from the subtended pole into 18 parts. 360° ÷ 9 = 40°  or   360° ÷ 18 = 20°, respectively.

 

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And this is the constellation, i.e. all the radiuses and their circles that we used from the 6 poles of the central (first) circle of the “Flower of Life.”

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And this is what all these radii look like – with their constellations presented in full circles from 6 poles of the central circle of the “Flower of Life”. Therefore, this is the initial data. The next step are the radiuses of the intersections of the “Flower of Life from the other 6 poles of the second circle of the “Flower of Life” which certainly bring forth new series of intersections and (don’t forget) new angular magnitudes.

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As we can see, most of the acquired results of series 3 and 5 are logical since in the first book referring to the “Flower of Life” we comprehended that the “flower of life” is a cube divided into 3 x 3 x 3 = cube of 3. Thereafter we utilized this as a trisecting tool for randomly given angles. In the last chapter, in tandem with the Star of David (the six-sided star polygon) we found that this was the universal code for trisection angles up to and in excess of 120°. From the very start, series of angular sizes brough about many innovative results. We will soon see what the new series will bring, but certainly a great deal, because the “Flower of Life” and the unveiling of its principles is sure enough the cornerstone of all our enigmas, both geometric and algebraic, and who knows what else. That is why the “Flower of Life” was highly regarded in ancient times as a “sacred gift”. And to this very day it is in some nations maintained as such, it seems to me, except in Egypt, where the pyramids are of highest importance. They likewise were built in conformity with the same coding system, and one day when the pyramids are opened, i.e. when the section in which their “records” are stored is discovered (which we consider is located in the area of two-thirds of the pyramid’s height), all this will be substantiated. In this natural system of ours there probably exists a universal design that is valid for all time, and maybe for all space, too. (From a theoretical aspect, during the just introduced observation of planets before our time, they say that there is mention of strange pyramidal objects perceived – whether creations of nature or ???, and the obviousness of the cube root of 3, and that root is a shortcut to calculating the height of an equilateral triangle, namely the root of 3 times the baseline divided by 2, thus giving us the height of every equilateral triangle. But, this is only theory. Thus we will not get “entangled” in theory, but will try to get results that are universal, and that this can be “read” from the ancient artifacts, geometrical symbols and translated into the language of contemporary geometry will follow in one of our following chapters.

HR – Rijeka, Jan. 24, 2012.
Tomo Periša

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2 Responses to “Flower of life (first analysis)”

  1. Aton says:

    Thx for the great insights!!!

  2. Jason says:

    Interesting work guys.

    Has Plato’s number (216) been a recurring appearance in your research of the flower of life? And if so, could you shed some light on it?

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